Category : Dessert

Pistachio Creams

Posted on: June 6th, 2017

Pistachio creams

What modern people would recognize as cooked custards or puddings we here in the 18th century call creams, which would be found in the dessert course of an elegant dinner. Creams came in a variety of flavors: chocolate, orange, lemon, almond, apple, and more. If you froze them they would become iced creams. …

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Celebrate the Holidays with our Cranberry Tart

Posted on: December 22nd, 2016

cranberry-tart

What could be more festive than a beautiful, shimmering ruby cranberry tart for the holidays? Each time we make one of Amelia Simmons’ cranberry tarts, visitors to the kitchen inevitably ask for the recipe.  Though simple and delicious, the directions are not as clear as most modern cooks would like them. Our Foodways staff worked out the recipe for you so that you can try this new take on cranberry sauce at home.…

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The Creation of Edible Art

Posted on: November 21st, 2016

Finished treat for edible art post Nov 2016

Sugar… Just the word conjures up feelings of warmth and comfort. We eat it at birthdays and weddings, we eat it in chocolate at holidays and we put raw sugar in our coffee and tea every morning. From World War II GIs eating M&Ms to countless pop culture mentions, sugar has always had a prominent place in the American pantry.

The 18th century was no different. …

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Sugar, Spice & All Things Nice!

Posted on: January 28th, 2016

ConfectionerFor many of us, these words evoke childhood memories of stories and nursery rhymes told by our grandparents and that warm and fuzzy feeling we get from remembering trips to the local candy store with the change Grandpa gave us from his pocket to buy that special treat!…

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Toast the Holidays With Chocolate Wine!

Posted on: December 23rd, 2015

chocolate wineWhat better way to celebrate the season than serving two of our favorite things together—chocolate and wine? Try serving this simple yet unexpected combination at your holiday party, or, if you are adventurous, for Christmas Breakfast. The Historic Foodways Staff wishes to thank everyone for your continued support. Thank you and have a wonderful Holiday Season!…

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Rice Omelet

Posted on: November 11th, 2015

Rice_Omelet_YouTubeHere at Historic Foodways, we never judge a recipe by its title.  This different version of a rice pudding has nothing to do with what we think of as an omelet. Instead, this lovely pudding has a think custard poured over a molded rice. It’s also gluten free!  Enjoy.…

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To Make an Apple Pudding

Posted on: September 24th, 2015

apple pud photo 7For those of you who are interested in trying to replicate the three recipes mentioned in A Tale of Three Apples, the following is the recipe for our boiled apple pudding.…

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A Look into the World of the 18th-century Confectioner!

Posted on: July 31st, 2015

Main-ImageIf someone were to hear “confectionery” or the “confectioner,” many foodies would draw upon images of sweet and delectable treats. The chocolate almond, strawberry creams, or even frozen delights, such as coffee ice cream. But salads?…

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A Tale of Three Apples

Posted on: July 21st, 2015

Final 3 apple (2)Sometimes you never know where a recipe will lead you. Recently, while making a boiled apple pudding, it occurred to me that there are many recipes that use the exact same ingredients—some type of pastry plus a filling. For example, a Beignet of Red Currant Jam, a Boiled Apple Pudding, and Kickshaw, are all essentially created using the same ingredients. What is different is the way in which they are cooked or baked.…

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Puff Pastry 101

Posted on: May 15th, 2015

Lots of 18th century recipes involve placing sweet or savory foodstuff into pastry — or a paste. Today we would call these crusts, or pie crusts.

Most modern cooks use one or two different crusts on a regular basis. Not so in the 18th century. The variety is vast and eclectic — cold, hot, puff, potato, crackling, good, dripping, standing, for custard, for tarts, light, crisp, for covers, for baskets … and the list goes on.

In this post, we’ll learn  to make one of the most feared of all — The Puff Paste.

Today, most people will give up before they even attempt puff pastry because of the myriad of steps, cooling and number of hours it takes to prepare a light, airy and crisp product.

But it does not have to be that difficult.

By following …

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