Meet Our Interns

Here in Colonial Foodways, we feel overjoyed and fortunate to have three new interns with us this summer.

All three are examining aspects of the social history of 18th-century Virginia foodways, concentrating on how food procurement, preparation and fashion have intersected with politics, class and gender. Each comes with a unique set of interests, experiences and training — which will only enrich our program as they develop their own particular historical-knowledge base and culinary repertoires.

Tiffany Fisk-Watts

Tiffany Fisk-Watts

Tiffany Fisk-Watts has been studying and interpreting colonial foodways for the past 15 years, focusing on the Eastern Pennsylvania region. In addition, she earned her MA in history with concentrations in colonial and public history, and works as a curatorial, archival and nonprofit management consultant. In addition to hearth-cooking and consulting, Tiffany enjoys reading, gardening, and maintaining a list of answers to the question: “Aren’t you hot (in that outfit)?”

Joseph Privott

Joseph Privott

Joseph Privott is a museum professional and practice-based researcher. He returns to the Historic Trades department to continue the conversation about industrial development, globalization and identity. Working with the dedicated staff of Food Programs has allowed him to hone existing skills and venture into new territories, such as traditional butchering. An explorer of global food heritage, Joseph appreciates the essential nature of food and its deep ties to individuals and the community. When he steps away from the hearth, he enjoys making, using and promoting quality hand work of all sorts.

Todd Ellick

Todd Ellick

Todd Ellick is a graduate student whose doctoral research examines German colonization — specifically its impact on indigenous populations in southern Namibia during the latter decades of the 19th century.  While he daydreams on long runs of one day opening up his own opulently themed colonial restaurant– to be aptly called “His Lordship’s” — Todd reaches past the syllabub and ficassee of eggs directly for the bread and stew.

 


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