What Exactly is a Rice Omelet?

Rice_Omelet_YouTubeHere at Historic Foodways, we never judge a recipe by its title.  This different version of a rice pudding has nothing to do with what we think of as an omelet. Instead, this lovely pudding has a think custard poured over a molded rice. It’s also gluten free!  Enjoy.

18th Century

“A quarter of a pound of Rice, boil it in new Milk until it is like a hasty Pudding, then put it in a dish to cool, when quite cold cut it in 8 quarters. Make a boiled Custard thick, and when you have laid the pieces in a China Dish, pour the Custard upon it, and lay on very piece Raspberry Jam or Currant Jelly, with a large piece in the middle.”

—From The Receipt Book of Baroness Dimsdale

21st Century

Rice Omlette

  • ¼ lb. rice
  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • Water
  • 2 eggs (large)
  • 2 Tbsp. sugar

Black Currant or Seedless Raspberry Jam

  1. Place the rice in a saucepan with one cup of heavy cream and ½ cup of water. Cook rice, stirring frequently, until rice is very soft and thick. Add more water if needed in order for the rice to break down into a mushy mass that resembles cooked oatmeal.
  2. Put rice into a lightly greased dish or pie plate, and let cool until it sets up. Cut into eight even pieces. The rice should hold together when cut. If it does not hold together put it back into a pot and cook a little longer.
  3. Place the eight slices in a circle on a plate, leaving gaps between each piece.

Custard

  1. Put two cups of heavy cream in a saucepan.
  2. Whisk in one whole egg and one yolk till well blended.
  3. Whisk in two tablespoons of sugar.
  4. Place pot on medium heat. Cook until thickened, stirring frequently, until it coats the back of a wooden spoon (as if you were dragging your finger through yogurt).
  5. Let custard cool for ten minutes before covering the eight sliced pieces completely with the custard. Dot each piece with a teaspoon of jam, and one large tablespoon in the middle.

5 Responses to “What Exactly is a Rice Omelet?”

  1. January 18th, 2016

    David Meyer says:

    made this tonight with Cheshire Pork Pie for dinner. My 21st Century palate wanted to make the rice portion a little sweeter with perhaps some more spices–nutmeg, cloves and maybe some almond–and serve it as a dessert. However it was delicious as a side dish. I also wondered about the rice we used, seemed to take a very long time to reach the desired level of doneness. I’m always scared when boiling creme so that could have been part of it, raising the temperature a bit might have helped

    • January 19th, 2016

      kcosta says:

      Hello David-

      I am so glad you made the recipe! As with all recipes, then or now, please feel free to add as much sugar and spices as you like. We follow the 18th century recipe as close to the original as possible, but that doesn’t mean someone else didn’t add nutmeg to it. If you like it then by all means add it. We use Carolina rice here in our kitchen, which should take sometimes as long as 45 minutes to cook. I don’t recommend turning up the heat level for the reason you stated above. Remember, all good things come to those who wait.

      Thank you for your comments,

      Kimberly Costa
      Historic Foodways

  2. December 19th, 2016

    Ashlee says:

    Hello,

    I found this recipe while looking for another we saw in your kitchen on Thanksgiving Day of this year. I’m looking forward to trying my hand at rice omelets (very interesting recipe!), but would love to find the recipe for what was marked “baked rice pudding.”

    • December 19th, 2016

      kcosta says:

      Hello Ashlee- I am so glad you came to the blog to check out our recipes! Here is the version of the rice pudding you saw on our table. I’ve added a few notes as you go along. From The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, by Hannah Glasse: To make a Rice Pudding. Take a quarter of a pound or rice, put it into a saucepan, with a quart of new milk (whole milk), a stick of cinnamon, stir it often, to keep it from sticking to the saucepan. When it has boiled thick, (about 20 minutes), pour it into a pan and stir in a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, and sugar to your palate (start with 1/4 cup and go from there); grate in half a nutmeg (1/2 tsp), add three or four spoon full of rosewater (1 tsp is enough, or add vanilla), and stir all well together, when it is cold, beat up eight eggs, with half the whites, beat it all well together, butter a dish and pour it in and bake it. You may lay in a puff paste first all over your dish (or any good pie crust), for a change, put in a few currants and sweet meats if you choose it. (try raisins or chopped candied peels). The pudding is done when a knife inserted into the middle comes out clean. Enjoy! Kimberly

    • December 19th, 2016

      kcosta says:

      Hello Ashlee- I am so glad you came to the blog to check out our recipes! Here is the version of the rice pudding you saw on our table. I’ve added a few notes as you go along. From The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, by Hannah Glasse: To make

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